THE METHOD OF FREE ASSOCIATION AND ITS APPLICATION TO IDENTIFY THE MAIN PERSISTENT FEARS AND THEIR DETERMINANTS

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Abstract

This article aims to identify the nature and the main determinants of fear experienced by cadets of Ukrainian higher military educational institutions and manifested in the actualization of the semantic component `fear` in the associations evoked by the visual emotional and appraising perception of knowledge about traumatic events. We argue that the forms of fear detected in cadets have common characteristics: 1) connection with prediction, that is, with the future; 2) activation of imagination in order to identify sources of danger; 3) presence of two components directly connected with cognitive activity, namely expectation and uncertainty. Cadets’ fear has the modality of anxiety, which can be characterized as a consequence of the inability to assess their own strength and resources.

How to Cite

Khraban, T. (2022). THE METHOD OF FREE ASSOCIATION AND ITS APPLICATION TO IDENTIFY THE MAIN PERSISTENT FEARS AND THEIR DETERMINANTS. Baltic Journal of Legal and Social Sciences, (1), 179-189. https://doi.org/10.30525/2592-8813-2022-1-21
Article views: 4 | PDF Downloads: 4

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Keywords

emotion, fear, military, association experiment, stress

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